STAND UP FOR YOUR CONVICTIONS


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In the operating room of a large, well-known hospital, it was the nurse’s first day on the surgical team.  She was responsible that all instruments and materials were accounted for before completing the final steps of the operation.   

She said to the surgeon,“You’ve only removed 11 sponges.  We used 12 sponges, and we need to find the last one.”

“I removed them all,” the doctor declared emphatically. “We’ll close the incision now.”

“No,”  the rookie nurse objected, “we used 12 sponges.”

“I’ll take the responsibility,” the surgeon said grimly.  “Suture.”

“You can’t do that, sir,” blasted the nurse. “think of the patient.”

The surgeon smiled and lifted his foot, showing the nurse the twelfth sponge. “You’ll do just fine in this or any other hospital.”

When you know you’re right, you can’t back down.

12 comments:

Jan said...

That is a very good clear-cut example, sometimes we think we are right, and we aren't, and after that we get conditioned to not speak up.
Karin, I pray that we speak up when we are right. Thanks for the post.

Thanks for all your thoughtful comments at my page.
Love and Blessings.

怡妹 said...

享受你自己的生活,不要與他人相比。 ..................................................

Bernie said...

This does prove a point and one should always speak the truth of their convictions.......:-) Hugs

Louise | Italy said...

What a nasty trick! And we all know how hard it can sometimes be to stick to our convictions in the face of authoritative opposition - after all, that's exactly what we are taught to do in school, isn't it?

Doris Sturm said...

Ditto and Amen!

Ruth's Photo Blog said...

Good lesson here.I hope you will have a day filled with God's love and peace.
Blessings,Ruth

Marg said...

That's not fair....but it's a good lesson taught. I'm glad that the Rookie insisted.

Glenda said...

Powerful story! I think your last line will stick with me: "When you know you're right, you can't back down."
Thanks!

Betty said...

Ich schreib mal in Deutsch, ja?
Dieses sprach sehr zu mir heute. Ich hätte gerne deine Meinung. Es ist nämlich so. Ich fühle das meine Mutter zu viel Medikamente bekommt, die machen sie ganz "betäubt". sie sieht wie eine wandelnde Leiche aus und ich mache mir sehr schwer darüber. Ist es jetzt an mir "aufzutrumpfen"? Wenn mein Vater es so will, das sie so ist, muss ich es zusehen, oder soll ich was zum Arzt direkt was sage? Ich habe schon zu meinem Vater darüber geredet, aber er sagt immer nur, das es so gut ist. Wird schon werden....
Danke fuer deinen Rat Karin!

Betsy from Tennessee said...

Hi Karin, Love that story!!!! I seemed to grow up in that 'fence-sitting' generation --of people trying to please and not standing up for our convictions as much as we should.

I used to say that people needed us 'fence-sitters' because we usually could see both sides of an issue and could help with compromising. But---sometimes, even WE need to stand up for our convictions. I've done better as I've gotten older!!!!!

We've had a wonderful day today at the beach... Beautiful weather after the rain yesterday (clear, sunny, breezy, warm---PERFECT)...

Hugs,
Betsy

Karin said...

That's probably why this story resonated with me so much.. I am so proud of this nurse for standing her ground even to this authority figure. Wish I had done that more often in life! Don't wait until you are older to learn this! But also, I've learned and am still learning to know when I'm wrong, to say so, back off, eat humble pie and learn from my error without feeling that I've made a permanent mess and can't be forgiven.

Laurie M. said...

I'd make a terrible nurse!